General Motors (GM) has decided that a battery defect exists in certain 2022-2023 GMC Hummer EVs and 2022 BrightDrop EV600s. While GM works to develop a fix for this condition, owners will receive interim notifications alerting them of the problem. Once a remedy becomes available, GM will send a second notification with a time frame for repairs.

GM first became aware of the problem in July 2022 after receiving Speak Up For Safety (SUFS) submissions relating to potential electrocoating and urethane sealing issues in certain Hummer EV battery packs. After further investigation, two manufacturing errors were identified.

  1. Under cured electrocoating along certain portions of the battery tray.
  2. Improper urethane seal repair could result in poor urethane seal adhesion in battery packs built during specific build windows.

According to the defect report, flanges on the battery pack enclosure may have been improperly primed or electrocoated, inhibiting proper adhesion of the urethane sealant. If water enters the battery pack enclosure and causes a battery pack malfunction, one or more malfunction indicator lamps may illuminate and the driver information center will display a warning message.

GM is aware of two field reports and a relevant report involving a GM test vehicle. All three vehicles had water leaks at urethane seals that had been repaired by the battery pack supplier during pack assembly. Water inside the battery packs triggered the vehicles’ onboard diagnostics, and the drivers received notification of a battery-pack malfunction.

GM is not aware of any accidents, injuries, or fires related to this condition. GM’s Safety Field Action Decision Authority (SFADA) decided to conduct a safety recall on vehicles containing packs with potentially improperly repaired urethane seals.

The remedy is currently under development. Interim letters notifying owners of the safety risk are expected to be mailed on November 28, 2022. Second letters will be sent once the remedy is available. GM’s number for this recall is N222380031 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-771.

The high voltage batteries in certain 2020 Ford Escape and 2021 Lincoln Corsair vehicles may have been manufactured with insufficient welds that could fail and cause a loss of drive power. These vehicles are equipped with 2.5L hybrid powertrains.

Ford’s Critical Concern Review Group first became aware of the problem in February 2022 when they were informed, by the supplier, that there was an issue with the weld penetration on the bus bars of certain high voltage batteries. A review of the manufacturers’ records showed that the suspect cause of the problem was damage to the laser cooling line caused by maintenance of the laser air knife. The damage to the laser cooling line resulted in an out-of-control weld process and insufficient welds. The suspect time period was between June 6, 2020, and June 12, 2020.

According to the safety report, insufficient weld penetration between the bus bar and cell terminal could result in a loss of electrical contact at the bus-bar weld joint inside the high voltage battery. Loss of electrical contact will result in a loss of motive power and an increased risk of an accident.

The vehicle warning display will illuminate a “Stop Safely Now” message, a wrench lamp, and an audible alert when the vehicle loses motive power.

Owners receiving notices will be asked to take their vehicle to their Ford or Lincoln dealer to have the High Voltage Battery replaced. The new High Voltage Battery LX68-10B759-R will have a bus bar that has proper weld penetration. The supplier repaired a damaged coolant line on June 27, 2020. High voltage batteries produced after June 27, 2020 were produced with sufficient bus bar weld penetration. Ford’s number for this recall is 22S33 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-331.

 Automotive Defect Investigation

The NHTSA have a continuing investigation into certain LGES high voltage batteries used in electric and hybrid vehicles. The investigation was prompted by the number of fire recalls on the electric and hybrid vehicles listed below. The purpose of this investigation is to find other companies that might have purchased the same or similar equipment from LG and to notify them if this defect has shown up in any vehicles they manufactured.


Recall No. 20V-107
Date: February 2020

Mercedes Benz USA notified NHTSA of a safety-related defect in one 2019 Smart ForTwo Electric Drive vehicle.
Note: This vehicle received an LG Chem high voltage battery that may contain a defect allowing for an electrical arc, which can ignite inside the battery cells, increasing the risk of a fire.


Recall No. 20V-630
Date: October 2020

Hyundai Motor America notified NHTSA of a safety-related defect in certain 2019-2020 Kona Electric vehicles. Note: The high-voltage battery system in the subject vehicles, supplied by LG, may have been produced with internal damage to certain cells of the lithium-ion battery increasing the risk of an electrical short circuit, which could result in a fire.


Recall No. 20V-701 & 21V-650
Date: November 2020

General Motors notified NHTSA of a safety defect in all 2017-2018 and certain 2019 Chevrolet Bolt EV vehicles.
Note: These vehicles were built with high voltage batteries, produced by LG, that may contain latent cell-level manufacturing defects posing a risk of fire when charged to full, or nearly full, capacity. In August 2021, GM expanded this recall to include certain 2020-2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV and 2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV vehicles. GM stated, “the root cause of the failure is the simultaneous presence of two rare manufacturing defects in the same battery cell.”


Recall No. 21V-127
Date: March 2021

Hyundai notified NHTSA of a safety-related defect in certain 2019-2020 Kona Electric and 2020 Ioniq Electric vehicles .
Note: These vehicles are equipped with LG produced Lithium-ion battery cells where, if the Anode (Negative) tab is folded, the battery cell could allow the Lithium plating on the Anode tab to contact the Cathode resulting in an electrical short, thereby increasing the risk of a fire while parked, charging and/or driving.


Recall No. 22V-077
Date: February 2022

Chrysler notified NHTSA of a safety-related defect in certain 2017-2018 Pacifica Plug-In Hybrid Electric vehicles.
Note: These Pacifica vehicles contain hybrid battery packs produced by LG. FCA has not yet determined whether the battery packs were defective or the root cause of the fires.


Recall No. 22V-162
Date: March 2022

Volkswagen notified NHTSA of a safety-related defect in certain 2021 ID4 vehicles.
Note: The high voltage batteries used in the vehicles may contain insufficient soldering points and thus contain unreliable connections inside the high voltage battery. As a result of the unreliable connections, the vehicles may break down or stall while driving, leading to a crash.

Over the years, automakers have invested billions of dollars into studies and research in an attempt to build the best electric vehicle, and as a result, electric vehicles have become more attractive and affordable for the average driver. The cost of an electric vehicle (EV) or plug-in hybrid (PHEV) are usually higher than a gas powered vehicles, but there are some federal and state electric car tax credits and incentives that can bring the upfront cost down. The Plug-In Electric Motor Vehicle Tax Credit is the main federal program for electric cars in the United States. Under this program, a new electric vehicle is eligible for a tax credit as long as it meets the federal electric car tax credit criteria. The federal tax credit applies to both all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid vehicles. The amount you can claim varies based on the vehicle model.

California is a leader in clean vehicle adoption with more plug-in electric vehicles on its roadways than any other state. This move away from gasoline and diesel brings environmental and economic benefits, including less air pollution and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. As long as funds are available, eligible California residents can apply for a Clean Vehicle Rebate (CVR) after purchasing or leasing an eligible vehicle.

It’s been thirty years since the first lithium-ion battery cell was used in camcorders, laptops and cell phones, and in those thirty years there have been fires. In 2019, the Federal Aviation Administration and the U.S. Department of Transportation jointly banned the shipment of lithium-ion batteries as cargo on passenger airplanes, and limited how they can be shipped on cargo aircraft, after several incidents were linked to battery fires. Now that they are in much larger products, like automobiles, battery fires draw even more media attention, especially when they occurred while vehicles are parked inside a garage.

The Chevrolet Bolt EV battery recall is one of the recalls that received a large amount of publicity for risk of fires. One case documented by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration talks about a Bolt that caught fire in a home where firefighters spent an hour trying to put out the flames. The fire restarted an hour later and reignited a third time after it was towed to a dealership. General Motors traced the problem to a manufacturing defect at the plant which supplied defective batteries that resulted in the Hyundai Kona EV recall as well. Ford recently recalled a small number of 2021-2022 Ford Escape and 2022 Lincoln Corsair hybrid power-train SUVs because the high voltage battery could experience an overheat situation, and Tesla cars have also, been investigated for fires. The most recent recall for battery problems affects certain 2017-2018 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid vehicles that could experience a fire, even with the ignition in the “OFF” mode.

Many plug-in electric vehicle fire incidents have taken place since the production of plug-in electric vehicles. As a result of these incidents, the United States, Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) conducts studies to establish whether lithium-ion batteries in plug-electric vehicles pose an exceptional fire hazard. The research looks into whether the high-voltage batteries can cause fires when they are being charged and when the vehicles are involved in an accident. The NHTSA “Battery Safety Initiative” for Electric Vehicles works to coordinate research and other activities to address safety risks relating to batteries in electric vehicles. They continue to examine data related to electric vehicle battery safety, field incidents and conduct special investigations of electric vehicle crash and non-crash events, to ensure that electric and hybrid vehicles don’t pose an unnecessary risk for drivers.

Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. (VW) will be asking a small number of 2021 VW ID.4 electric crossover SUV owners, to return to their dealerships because of a problem affecting the solder connections inside the HV battery of their vehicles. This defect could result in a stall and may increase the risk of an accident. A fix for this problem is still under development by the manufacturer.

VW became aware of the defect in January 2021 when the first known field case occurred outside the U.S. VW quality and safety departments began to monitor the field reports for the nature and frequency of the non-starting condition and found reports of similar problems in other brand vehicles using the same or similar battery systems. During a multi-brand clearing committee meeting, impacted brands shared information on the potential stall while driving cases and decided to conduct a recall. Volkswagen will be conducting a recall on 351, 2021 VW ID.4 vehicles in the U.S. that contain the potentially affected parts.

According to the defect report, a manufacturing problem with the high voltage (HV) battery may have caused incorrect soldering on specific points of the flexible printed circuit assembly (FPCA). The amount of solder contact points of the FPCA is not sufficient and the thickness of the solder layer is out of tolerance parameters. The result is an unreliable connection inside the HV battery that could lead to a breakdown or stalling while driving. If this issue is present in the vehicle, the driver will be alerted by a high voltage system warning message in the instrument panel.

Owner notification letters about the defect are expected to be mailed by May 13, 2022. Volkswagen’s number for this recall is 9302 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-1562.

Are you experiencing repeated problems with your hybrid or electric vehicle? Do you think it could be a lemon? If you have any questions about your rights and the California Lemon Law, please call our office at 888-395-3666 and get some great Lemon Law advice!

A small number of 2021-2022 Ford Escape and 2022 Lincoln Corsair hybrid power-train SUVs have been manufactured with a high voltage battery that could fail and result in a sudden loss of motor power. The problem was brought to Ford’s Critical Concern Review Group in October 2021 after an issue pertaining to an overheated high voltage battery bus bar was reported in Germany. Through a search of warranty reports, Ford identified an additional vehicle in Europe that reported a loss of function due to the overheated high voltage battery bus-bar.

During the manufacturing process, the high voltage bus-bar pad was not properly seated and could cause the pad to be mounted out of position prior to bus-bar welding. This condition could reduce the contact area between the cell terminal and the bus bar, giving it a high resistance. The high resistance could eventually result in an overheat situation.

According to the defect report, an overheated bus bar terminal may create a high resistance connection that could cause the battery pack high voltage bus voltage to fall below an operational level. If this happens, the hybrid power-train control module will sense the high voltage and detect a fault. A diagnostic trouble code will be sent and the vehicle will lose power. Drivers will also notice a “Stop Safely Now” warning message displayed on the instrument panel.

Ford’s team reviewed supplier process and production records to determine the population of affected parts. Affected vehicles are equipped with the 2.5L Hybrid power train and the suspect high voltage battery pack.

Dealers will replace the high voltage battery. Ford’s number for this recall is 21S48 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-149.

Do you think your Ford Escape or Lincoln Corsair could be a Lemon? Don’t live with a Lemon, especially if the problems you are having are safety-related. If you have any questions about your rights and the California Lemon Law, please call our office at 888-395-3666 for some great Lemon Law advice.