Ford Escape GearshiftFord has discovered a problem affecting specific hybrid vehicles, including the 2022-2024 Maverick, 2020-2022 Escape, and 2021-2022 Lincoln Corsair models. These vehicles may contain software that could cause the vehicle to shift into neutral unexpectedly.

Investigation and Findings

In March 2024, Ford’s Critical Concern Review Group (CCRG) initiated an investigation following field reports indicating that some vehicles were shifting to neutral after receiving a Hybrid Powertrain Control Module (HPCM) software update at dealerships. The powertrain controls and calibration team discovered that the new Hybrid Transmission Internal Park Module (HTIPM) software, which had been released for service in January 2024, was incorrectly detecting noise in the Park Motor Position Sensor. This led to the generation of erroneous Park Motor Position Sensor Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) U1010 and U1011.

Field Action Approval

On May 3, 2024, Ford’s Field Review Committee examined the issue and approved a field action to address the problem. According to the defect report, the affected vehicles received HPCM software that could force the vehicle into a neutral state while driving. As the vehicle coasts to a stop, the transmission will automatically shift to “Park”. Despite this issue, drivers retain functionality for power braking and power steering. Once the driver shifts back to drive, the vehicle enters a limp home mode, which provides limited torque at low speeds up to 30 mph.

Reported Incidents and Warranty Claims

Ford has reported 315 warranty claims in North America and 125 Vehicle Owner Questionnaires (VOQs) that may be related to this software issue. These incidents highlight the importance of addressing the defect to ensure driver safety and vehicle reliability.

Recall Details and Owner Notification

To rectify the problem, dealers will update the HPCM software free of charge. Ford plans to mail owner notification letters starting on May 23, 2024. For reference, Ford’s recall number for this issue is 24S33, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) campaign number is 24V-330.

Owners of the affected vehicles are encouraged to contact their dealers promptly to schedule the necessary software update. Ensuring that your vehicle receives this update is crucial for maintaining optimal performance and safety.

Summary

  • Affected Vehicles: 2022-2024 Ford Maverick, 2020-2022 Ford Escape, and 2021-2022 Lincoln Corsair hybrid models.
  • Issue: Software may cause unexpected shifts into neutral.
  • Investigation Start: March 2024 by Ford’s CCRG.
  • Findings: Noise in Park Motor Position Sensor detected by HTIPM software, causing erroneous DTCs U1010 and U1011.
  • Action Approved: May 3, 2024, by Ford’s Field Review Committee.
  • Incidents Reported: 315 warranty claims and 125 VOQs in North America.
  • Solution: HPCM software update by dealers.
  • Owner Notification: Letters to be mailed starting May 23, 2024.
  • Recall Numbers: Ford 24S33, NHTSA 24V-330.

In recent years, advancements in automotive technology have led to increasingly sophisticated control systems within vehicles, aimed at enhancing performance, efficiency, and safety. However, with these advancements come the potential for unforeseen challenges and issues to arise.

One such challenge has been identified in certain models of Ford vehicles, specifically the 2021-2024 Ford Bronco Sport and the 2022-2023 Ford Maverick. The concern centers around the failure of the body control module (BCM) and powertrain control module (PCM) to accurately detect changes in the state of charge of the 12-volt battery. This oversight has significant implications, as it could result in a loss of drive power, thereby increasing the risk of accidents and compromising the safety of both drivers and passengers.

The issue first came to light in October 2023, when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Office of Defects Investigation (NHTSA ODI) initiated an inquiry following reports of loss of motive power (LOMP) and subsequent loss of 12-volt accessories in 2021 model year Bronco Sport vehicles. Upon receiving 29 potentially relevant Vehicle Owner Questionnaires (VOQs) from NHTSA, Ford’s Critical Concern Review Group (CCRG) promptly launched an investigation to delve deeper into the matter.

Subsequent testing and analysis revealed a fundamental flaw in the BCM and PCM calibrations, rendering them incapable of accurately detecting battery failure in the affected vehicles. This deficiency becomes particularly pronounced during instances where the alternator struggles to meet the electrical load demand or during Auto Stop-Start events. As a result, drivers may experience unexpected loss of drive power, posing a serious safety hazard.

In response to these findings, Ford’s Field Review Committee took decisive action and authorized a vehicle recall to address the underlying issue. Under the recall, authorized dealerships will undertake corrective measures by re-calibrating the BCM and PCM to ensure accurate monitoring of the 12-volt battery state of charge. The recall process is expected to commence soon, with owner notification letters slated to be mailed out on May 13, 2024.

However, the implications of this issue extend beyond the immediate safety concerns. Ford acknowledges a significant number of warranty reports, field reports, and customer complaints related to this issue, totalling 917, 11, and 54 respectively. Moreover, there have been alarming reports of three unverified incidents of fire and two property damage claims allegedly linked to this concern. These statistics underscore the urgency of addressing the issue promptly and comprehensively.

In light of these developments, Ford has assigned a unique recall number, 24S24, and the corresponding NHTSA campaign number is 24V-267.

In a recent announcement, Ford has highlighted a critical concern affecting a specific subset of its 2023 Ford Explorer vehicles. The issue revolves around the right-front lower fastener connecting the steering knuckle and strut, which may either be loose or missing altogether. This problem can have significant repercussions on the vehicle’s performance and safety.

A loose or missing connection between the knuckle and strut can lead to improper tire alignment, potentially causing steering pulls or requiring increased steering effort. Moreover, the proximity of the brake hose to the tire in this compromised setup poses an additional risk. If the hose comes into contact with the tire, it may sustain damage resulting in a brake fluid leak, ultimately leading to a loss of braking ability. These circumstances significantly elevate the likelihood of a crash, underscoring the severity of the situation.

Upon receiving a report of a missing fastener,Ford’s Critical Concern Review Group (CCRG) initiated an investigation at the beginning of January 2024. The Plant Vehicle Team (PVT) at the Assembly Plant promptly identified the issue during a routine warranty claim review. Further analysis revealed that the primary double spindle fixture tool responsible for securing the right front knuckle-to-strut fasteners was offline for repairs during a specific period. This temporary setback affected a limited number of vehicles, with Ford confirming that out of 121 Explorer rotations, only one vehicle was found to have a missing fastener. Nonetheless, the company is taking proactive steps to address the concern.

While Ford has not identified any vehicle owner questionnaires (VOQs) related to this condition, it’s crucial for affected vehicle owners to remain vigilant. Signs of potential issues include a visually detectable tire leaning inward at the top or changes in steering effort or pull. Additionally, if there are any indications of tire contact with the strut or spring seat, such as abrasion damage or a burning smell, prompt action is necessary.

In response to this concern, Ford has announced a field action to have the affected vehicles inspected. Dealers will thoroughly examine the fasteners and take appropriate measures, such as tightening or installing them as needed, to rectify the issue. Affected vehicle owners can reference Ford’s recall number 24S04 and the corresponding NHTSA campaign number 24V-091 for further information and to schedule inspections.

Importance of Keeping Records for Lemon Vehicles:

Maintaining detailed records of repairs and maintenance for your vehicle is essential, especially if you suspect that your vehicle might be a lemon. Lemon laws vary by jurisdiction, but generally, they provide recourse for consumers who have purchased a defective vehicle that the manufacturer has failed to repair adequately within a reasonable number of attempts.

Keeping comprehensive records serves several purposes. Firstly, it provides documentation of the issues you’ve experienced and the attempts made to address them, which can be crucial evidence if you need to pursue legal action under lemon laws. Additionally, it helps establish a pattern of recurring problems, strengthening your case for a vehicle replacement or refund.

Furthermore, detailed records can expedite the repair process by providing technicians with essential information about past issues and repairs. This can help diagnose and resolve problems more efficiently, minimizing inconvenience for you as the owner.

In summary, maintaining thorough records of repairs and maintenance is not only good practice for vehicle ownership but can also be invaluable if you find yourself grappling with a lemon. By documenting issues and repairs diligently, you empower yourself to assert your rights as a consumer and seek appropriate recourse if necessary.

Ford Motor Company is reaching out to owners of certain 2023 F-150 and Ford Super Duty vehicles, including the F250, F350, F450, F550, and F600 models. There is a concern with the driver’s frontal air bag not deploying during a crash.

The issue came to light in November 2023, when Ford’s main supplier, BCS Automotive Interface Solutions, alerted them about a potential problem. This was linked to airbag clock springs provided by American Furukawa, a sub-supplier to BCS. BCS discovered that some clock spring assemblies in the Steering Column Control Modules (SCCM) they supplied to Ford might have been tainted during production.

The problem lies in the SCCM of the affected vehicles, where the clock spring assembly might have a weak weld between the bus bar and the ribbon cable. This issue traces back to the manufacturing stage, where clock spring bus bars were washed in isopropyl alcohol mixed with glycerin. This mix could weaken the weld between the bus bar and ribbon cable in the clock spring assembly.

This ribbon cable is crucial as it connects to the driver’s airbag. A weak weld can cause the ribbon cable circuits to disconnect, leading to a loss of electrical connection to the driver’s front airbag. This malfunction would trigger the airbag warning light and prevent the airbag from deploying as needed. Ford, alongside BCS, has been investigating this issue. They’re reviewing production and shipping records to identify which Ford vehicles might be equipped with the affected clock springs.

As of December 6, 2023, Ford received 19 warranty reports dating from May 1 to November 10, 2023, which could be linked to this clock spring issue.

Drivers might notice problems like non-functional steering wheel switches (like radio controls), a silent horn, and an illuminated airbag warning lamp.

Affected owners will be contacted to bring their vehicles to Ford dealers for an inspection and, if necessary, a replacement of the air bag clock spring. Initial notifications to owners explaining the safety risk are planned for January 8, 2024. A follow-up notice will be sent once the replacement parts are ready, expected in the second quarter of 2024. This recall is officially listed under the NHTSA campaign number 23V-847.

Certain 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E cars might face a power problem due to an overheated high voltage battery contactor, potentially leading to an increased risk of accidents.

In June 2022, Ford’s Field Review Committee (FRC) gave the green light to a Field Service Action (FSA) named 22S41, specifically designed to tackle concerns regarding the overheating of the high voltage battery main contactor in select 2021-2022 Mustang Mach-E vehicles. To fix this issue, dealers updated the software for the Secondary On-Board Diagnostic Control Module (SOBDMC) and the Battery Energy Control Module (BECM). The enhanced SOBDMC software keeps an eye on the contactor’s temperature and smartly reduces the battery’s power output to prevent further damage. Meanwhile, the upgraded BECM software checks the contactor’s resistance to identify any damage, then it generates a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) and lowers the vehicle’s power to avoid more harm.

At the time of approving this FSA, Ford’s Critical Concern Review Group (CCRG) and Electrical Propulsion Engineering (EPE) teams found the software updates for BECM and SOBDMC to be a suitable way to minimize the safety risks linked to power loss. The software update, by monitoring contactor resistance, warns customers if the resistance exceeds a certain limit. Alongside the warning, the software reduces power to prevent further contactor damage and the associated power loss risk. Even with the reduced power, customers can safely accelerate to highway speeds. This approach was also reviewed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

In June 2022, Ford Motor Company decided to issue a safety recall (NHTSA Recall 22V-412) for 48,924 model year 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E vehicles produced between May 27, 2020, and May 24, 2022. This recall was prompted by concerns about high voltage battery contactors overheating, primarily due to direct current (DC) fast-charging and repeated full-throttle pedal events. This overheating could lead to arcing or deformation of the electrical contact surfaces. If this occurs, the contactor could either remain open or get welded shut. An overheated contactor that opens while driving may lead to an immediate loss of power without re-engagement.

Following consumer complaints, the Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) initiated a Recall Query (RQ) for 2021-2022 Ford Mach-E vehicles included in Recall 22V-412. These vehicles had previously received a remedy involving a Secondary On-Board Diagnostic Control Module (SOBDMC) software update to monitor contactor temperature and reduce battery power to protect the contactor, as well as a Battery Energy Control Module (BECM) software update to monitor contactor resistance and reduce vehicle power in case of an overheated contactor.

To address this issue, dealers will replace the high voltage battery junction box. This recall is identified by Ford as 23S56, and the corresponding NHTSA campaign number is 22V-687. Vehicles included in this recall that were previously repaired under recall 22V-412 will need to have the new remedy completed.

Ford Motor Company (Ford) is taking action to address a safety concern with specific 2020-2022 Lincoln Aviator and 2020-2022 Ford Explorer vehicles that are equipped with 3.0L PHEV (Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle) engines. These vehicles may have a manufacturing defect in one or more of the high voltage battery cells, which could lead to an internal short circuit and a potential battery fire.

Discovery of the Issue

Ford became aware of this issue in June 2023 when they received a report regarding thermal venting problems with the PHEV battery used in these vehicles. The report highlighted a 2021 model year Transit Custom in France experiencing PHEV battery thermal venting. Subsequent analysis, conducted by the battery cell supplier, revealed an internal short circuit in the vehicle’s high voltage battery pack, partly due to the presence of a folded anode tab, which occurred during the cell manufacturing process.

Ongoing Investigation

The supplier’s investigation indicated that another, as yet unidentified, factor is necessary for the folded anode tab condition to lead to battery thermal venting. The supplier is actively conducting component-level testing to pinpoint this second factor. While this factor remains unknown, the Ford Critical Concern Review Group (CCRG) has been working to identify the group of vehicles that may potentially have the cell folded anode tab condition.

Additional Incidents

Ford was aware of three more instances of cells with folded anode tabs in the field. These incidents involved a 2020 model year Aviator in the United States, resulting in PHEV battery thermal venting, another 2020 model year Aviator in the United States resulting in a Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) but no battery thermal venting, and a 2020 model year Aviator in Canada, also resulting in an MIL but no battery thermal venting.

Preventive Measures

To address this issue, Ford has reviewed the cell supplier’s manufacturing process and made improvements during cell production to reduce the occurrence of the folded anode tab condition. The timing of these process enhancements has been used by the CCRG to determine the affected population of vehicles.

Recall Procedure

Owners of the affected vehicles will be notified and requested to visit their authorized Ford dealers for a Battery Energy Control Module (BECM) diagnostic test. If the test identifies a battery problem, the high voltage battery pack will be replaced at no cost to the owner. To check if your vehicle is part of this recall, refer to Ford’s recall number 23S53 and the NHTSA campaign number 23V-626.

ford-mustang-mach-e

In the realm of electric vehicles (EVs), the 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E gained significant attention for its sleek design and promising performance. However, beneath its exterior allure, a complex challenge emerged that put the spotlight on battery-related issues. In June 2022, Ford Motor Company took steps to issue a safety recall (NHTSA Recall 22V-412) for a range of Mustang Mach-E vehicles, acknowledging battery problems that had the potential to impact both safety and performance.

2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E Battery Recall

The safety recall was prompted by concerns related to high voltage battery main contactors. These components, integral to the functioning of the vehicle’s battery system, were at risk of overheating. The primary culprits behind this issue were the effects of direct current (DC) fast-charging and frequent aggressive acceleration events, which placed excessive stress on these contactors. Overheating, led to arcing or deformation of the electrical contact surfaces. Perhaps the most alarming consequence was the potential for a contactor to remain open, resulting in a sudden loss of motive power during driving. This raised significant safety concerns due to the increased risk of accidents resulting from unexpected power loss.

The Office of Defects Investigation

The recall was further complicated by the involvement of the Office of Defects Investigation (ODI). Following the initial recall (22V-412) involving approximately 48,924 vehicles, the ODI received a series of consumer complaints. These complaints highlighted incidents of high voltage battery main contactor failures even after the prescribed remedy had been implemented. This indicated that the initial software updates, aimed at temperature monitoring and power reduction, might not have fully resolved the underlying issues. This discrepancy called into question the effectiveness of the initial recall and the adequacy of its remedy.

Ford’s Response

In response to the ongoing concerns, Ford issued a Technical Service Bulletin TSB 23-2020 which focused on replacing the High Voltage Battery Junction Box (HVBJB) in the affected vehicles. The HVBJB is a crucial component that facilitates the connection between various parts of the high voltage battery system. Consumers who had experienced a loss of motive power post the initial recall were directed towards this bulletin. The bulletin aimed to ensure that the remedy for the contactor failures was comprehensive and addressed any lingering issues.

Addressing The Problem

The complexity of addressing battery-related problems in the 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E underscored the challenges of integrating advanced EV technology into mainstream vehicles. The initial recall and its subsequent developments shed light on the interplay between software solutions and hardware replacements. While software updates were intended to mitigate the risks, the need for a hardware replacement (HVBJB) became evident as consumer complaints persisted.

Conclusion

The battery problems encountered by the 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E vehicles served as a valuable lesson for both automakers and consumers in the evolving world of electric vehicles. The recall (22V-412), the Office of Defects Investigation’s involvement, and Ford’s multi-faceted response emphasized the importance of thorough and quick problem-solving in this rapidly advancing domain. As the automotive industry continues to innovate, experiences like these pave the way for safer and more reliable electric vehicles in the future.

2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E Lemon Vehicle

If you find yourself grappling with persistent issues in your 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E vehicle, the California Lemon Law can offer you a potential lifeline. Designed to protect consumers from purchasing or leasing defective vehicles, this law provides a pathway to relief if your vehicle is deemed a “lemon.” If your Mustang Mach-E experiences substantial defects that impair its use, safety, or value, and these issues persist despite a reasonable number of repair attempts within the vehicle’s warranty period, you may be entitled to a replacement vehicle or a refund of the purchase price. The California Lemon Law serves as a crucial safeguard, empowering you to take decisive action to address your vehicle’s ongoing problems and helping you move forward with confidence.

f150-braking

Ford has been monitoring certain 2021-2023 Ford F-150 trucks equipped with single exhaust systems due to potential issues with the electric parking brake. Reports have surfaced indicating an unexpected activation of the parking brake, sparking concern among owners and the automaker alike. In response, Ford’s Critical Concern Review Group (CCRG) launched an investigation to assess the problem’s magnitude and potential root causes.

The initial investigation began after Ford received troubling reports of unintended parking brake application on a 2021 model year F-150 truck. Warranty and field reports revealed signs of damage to the wiring harness housing the rear electric parking brake circuits. Such damage raised red flags, necessitating a closer look to ensure the safety and reliability of these vehicles.

Looking deeper into the issue, Ford’s team of experts discovered that the damaged wiring was a component of the rear axle wiring harness assembly. This particular harness assembly not only houses wires for the rear electric parking brakes but also serves other essential electrical components. The investigation highlighted that, in certain scenarios, the rear axle wiring harness bundle could make contact with the rear axle housing, leading to chafing of the wiring bundle.

Over time, this chafing effect could wear through the abrasion-resistant tape and circuit insulation, ultimately exposing the underlying copper wiring. The consequence of this exposure could be the grounding of circuits on the rear axle housing, which in turn could cause unintended activation of the electric parking brake. Adding to the complexity, corrosion on the rear axle housing could accelerate the abrasion process, compounding the problem.

Ford’s engineering team took the investigation further by conducting comprehensive vehicle-level testing and data analysis. The goal was to understand the implications of damaged circuits within the wiring harness bundle. They discovered that if the low side electric parking brake motor circuit experienced a short to ground, it could trigger the unintended activation of the electric parking brake, potentially leading to hazardous situations.

Ford are initiating a recall to resolve this issue. Owners of affected vehicles will receive official notices instructing them to take their vehicles to authorized Ford or Lincoln dealers for thorough inspections of the rear axle wiring harness.

During the inspection, if the technicians observe any wear on the abrasion tape covering the wire bundle, the suspect harness will be replaced with a new service harness. In cases where the abrasion tape shows no signs of wear, the dealer will take preventive measures by installing a protective tie strap and tape wrap, ensuring the wiring remains secure and safeguarded against future issues.

Ford is aware of 918 warranty and three field reports in North America for the wire chafing condition. Of these reports, 299 indicated that the electric parking brake had unintended activation, of which nineteen (19) allege electric parking brake application while driving. Ford has assigned a recall number to this campaign, which is 23S35. Additionally, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has designated the campaign as number 23V-509.