Chrysler (FCA US, LLC) will be contacting owners of certain Chrysler, Alfa Romeo, and RAM vehicles for a problem affecting the fuel system. In total, approximately 236 000 vehicles are being recalled.

2020-2021 Alfa Romeo Stelvio and Alfa Romeo Giulia vehicles fuel line sensor housing may crack and leak fuel. NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V-878

The problem was traced to September 11, 2020, when defective fuel sensors were introduced into vehicle production, and ended on May 25, 2021, when the fuel sensors from the suspect batches were no longer used. The suspect population was determined using part traceability and vehicle production records.

According to the defect report, a leak in the fuel line sensor may cause fuel starvation of the engine and in rare circumstances, if the leaked fuel comes in contact with an ignition source, a fire could occur. A vehicle fire can result in an increased risk of occupant injury and/or injury to persons outside the vehicle, as well as property damage. Fuel starvation could also result in an unexpected loss of motive power.

2019 Fiat 124 Spider fuel pump failure may cause an engine stall. NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V-879

The suspect period began on April 6, 2018, when the defective fuel delivery module (FDMs) were introduced into vehicle production, and ended on October 18, 2018, when FDMs with improved molding of the impellers were implemented in vehicle production.

Some 2019 Fiat 124 Spider vehicles may have been manufactured with a fuel delivery module (FDM) with impellers that could deform. An FDM with a deformed impeller may interfere with other fuel pump components which can inhibit the operation of the fuel pump potentially causing fuel starvation. : Fuel starvation may result in an unexpected loss of motive power.

2019-2020 RAM 2500, 3500, 4500, and 5500 diesel trucks fuel pump failure may cause an engine stall.
NHTSA Campaign Number: 21V-880

The suspect period began on October 11, 2018, when Cummins 6.7L Turbo Diesel engines with suspect HPFPs were introduced into vehicle production, and ended on November 13, 2020, when Cummins 6.7L Turbo Diesel engines with suspect HPFPs were no longer used in vehicle production.

According to the defect report, the high-pressure fuel pump could fail and introduce debris into the fuel system. Fuel starvation and an unexpected loss of motive power could result without prior warning. Vehicle occupants may notice an illuminated Malfunction Indicator Lamp, a fuel leak or smell, abnormal engine noises, or a change in drive quality.

During a configuration review at the supplier for an unrelated manufacturing issue, FCA US LLC Product Engineering became aware of an error with an airbag squib driver circuit that identified three internal faults not mapped to a diagnostic trouble code (DTC). An investigation was opened and it was discovered that some 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee, 2022 Jeep Wagoneer, and 2022 Jeep Grand Wagoneer vehicles may not set a DTC, and the airbag warning indicator may not illuminate.

The problem started in February 2021, when occupant restraint controllers (ORCs) with an incorrect software version were introduced into vehicle production, through to November 1, 2021, when the suspect ORCs were no longer used in vehicle production. Vehicle and supplier production records were used to determine the vehicles included in the recall population.

According to the defect report, “If specific ORC internal faults are active then a DTC will not be set and the airbag warning indicator may not illuminate. The internal faults will disable deployment of both the driver and passenger airbag squib 3 (related to airbag venting post-deployment) and knee airbags. The airbag warning indicator may not illuminate to notify the driver of possible compromised airbag system functionality. Reduced occupant protection in the event of a crash may result in an increased risk of injury to motor vehicle occupants.”

Owners receiving notices will be asked to return to their FCA dealers to have the occupant restraint controller reprogrammed with the correct software version that maps subject internal faults to a DTC. FCA US, LLC’s number for this recall is Y79 and the NHTSA campaign number is 21V-873.

If you purchased or leased a defective vehicle in California, it has turned out to be a lemon, and you need help to get rid of it, just fill out the above contact form or call us now at 1-888-395-3666 for a free case evaluation.

Our client purchased a new 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee.

The first visit for service was on January 8, 2018 because the regeneration light was turning on and off and they needed to replace the key battery.

The next visit was on February 5th as the vehicle was still regenerating and having fumes coming into the cabin. The vehicle had regenerated 4 times in less than 1000 miles.

On May 22nd the Exhaust regeneration message came on the dash.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee was back in the shop on June 5th because after performing an oil change the vehicle was being prompted to regenerate after 150 miles.

Our client was back at the authorized dealership on September 18th for service as the Check engine light was on.

November 3rd the check engine light was on again, the throttle light was on and the exhaust filter was 100% full.

The last visit was on November 27th and the check engine light was on again and the message, “The exhaust filter is nearly full” came on.

It was at this point that our client looked into the California Lemon Law and called our firm, The Law Office of Barry L. Edzant and spoke with the attorney. He requested that some documents be emailed over for his review. After discussing the potential Lemon Law case with the gentleman, he decided to sign a retainer agreement.

A demand letter was sent to FCA, USA to buy back the 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee under the California Lemon Law. FCA, USA decided to buy it back and reimbursed the client for their down payment, any payments made thus far, registration and pay off the balance of the loan minus a usage fee the manufacturer is entitled to under the Lemon Law. They also paid attorney fees.

Our client was very happy with the buyback. If you are having problems with your vehicle and think you may be driving a lemon, please contact our offices at 888-395-3666.

Our client purchased a 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee.

On September 28, 2018 he took his Jeep Grand Cherokee in for service because the A/C was not blowing cold air.

On March 19, 2019 he brought it back to the dealership because the A/C was not blowing cold air again.

On June 14th it was back at the dealership because there was a Freon or a chemical type smell upon turning the A/C on. The A/C was also making a loud hissing sound and would not get cooler as the day got hotter. Sometimes the A/C would not even turn on at all.

July 15th he brought it back to the dealership because the A/C would stop working after about an hour and there was still a hissing sound coming out of it.

It was at this point that he called our office for a free consultation with California Lemon Law Attorney, Barry L Edzant. After speaking with Mr. Edzant he sent in some paperwork to be reviewed. He signed on as a client and a demand letter was sent in to FCA, USA.

FCA, USA decided to buy back the vehicle under the California Lemon Law and reimbursed our client for his down payment, all payments made, his registration and paid off the vehicle minus a usage fee that manufacturer is entitled to under the law. They also paid the attorney fees. Our client was very happy with the result.

If you are having problem with your vehicle and have questions about your rights and the California Lemon Law, please call our office at 888-395-3666.

Our client bought a new 2017 Fiat Spider 124.

Her first visit to the authorized service department was on January 23, 2018. There were two problems at the time. The first problem was that the check engine light was on and the other was a very serious problem as the vehicle had lost power while she was driving.

The next visit was on June 1st. It was in for a coolant leak, the vehicle RPMs were revving high and she requested they inspect the rear suspension as the tires were wearing unevenly. Her Fiat was at the dealership for 28 days.

It was at this point that she wanted to know more about the California Lemon Law and if she was driving a lemon.

She contacted the Law Office of Barry L. Edzant, a California Lemon Law Attorney with over 32 years of specializing in the Lemon Law. She spoke with Mr. Edzant and he then asked her to email some documents for him to review. After Barry reviewed the paperwork and explained to the client her rights, she decided to retain our law firm. A letter was sent to FCA, USA demanding that they buy back the vehicle under the California Lemon Law.

Our firm successfully got a full repurchase for our client for her defective 2017 Fiat Spider 124. The buyback included the reimbursement of all payments made to date, the down payment, the registration, paying off the loan less a mileage deduction allowed under the California Lemon Law. FCA also paid for the attorney fees.

If you think your vehicle may be a lemon, please contact the Law Office of Barry L. Edzant at 888-395-3666. We’ll be happy to answer your questions. We are a California statewide Lemon Law firm.

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) have discovered that a safety defect exists in certain 2017-2020 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid vehicles. Chrysler advises owners to take additional safety measures until the problem can be fixed by their dealership.

“Note: Consumers are advised to exercise the following precautions until the vehicle has the final repair completed: Do not park inside of buildings, near structures or other vehicles. Additionally, keep liquids out of the backseat area, including but not limited to beverages, wet items, umbrellas, or bottled liquids that may leak.”

According to the defect report, some 2017-2020 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid vehicles may experience a high resistance electrical connection at the 12 volt isolator post. This high resistance could lead to prolonged heating and a potential vehicle fire even with the vehicle shut off.

A remedy for this recall is currently under development. In the meantime, notices will be sent out to owners instructing them to return to their dealers to have an interim inspection of this connection. If the inspection indicates the joint is compromised, owners will receive a loaner vehicle until a fix is developed.

Interim notifications are expected to begin around June 22, 2020. FCA US LLC’s number for this recall is W46 and the NHTSA campaign number is 20V-334.

Chrysler will be contacting certain 2017 Fiat 500X owners about a safety problem affecting their vehicles. According to the defect report, the low tire pressure monitoring system (TPMS) warning light may not illuminate under certain circumstances. Driving on under inflated tires could result in reduced vehicle handling and in rare cases, the potential for complete tire failure.

Dealers will correct the problem by updating the instrument panel software. The recall is expected to begin April 21, 2017. Owners wanting more information about the problem are asked to contact Chrysler customer service at 1-800-853-1403. Chrysler’s number for this recall is T16 and the NHTSA campaign number is 17V-146.

After leasing a 2013 Fiat 500 Electric vehicle in February 2014, the owner found herself returning to an FCA dealership in September 2014 for repairs. She subsequently provided FCA four (4) more opportunities to fix problems, which kept her vehicle out of service for more than 67 days. When she contacted the Law Offices of Delsack & Associates P.C. she told us she was having problems with the:

  • Power Inverter Module (PIM)
  • ABS system
  • Regenerative Braking Controller (RBC)
  • Body Control Module (BCM)
  • On Board Charging Module (OBCM)
  • Propulsion Warning System

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