Automotive Defect InvestigationThe National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) issues safety standards that require automobile manufacturers to recall vehicles that have safety-related defects. An important first step to identifying a problem is to keep a database of complaints received from owners. Similar complaints from a number of owners about the same product are usually a good indication that a problem could exist. The NHTSA will review the complaints and, in most cases, open an investigation. If the investigation leads to a recall, the NHTSA will monitor the effectiveness and management of the recall, including the filing of recall notices, communicating with owners regarding the recalls, and tracking the completion rate of each recall.

The NHTSA currently has three investigations affecting certain Chrysler, Dodge, and Jeep vehicles.

Stalling And Loss Of Motive Power Due To Transmission Malfunction
2019-2021 Chrysler Pacifica and 2019-2020 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid

The Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) has received 40 complaints alleging incidents of stalling and loss of motive power in certain 2019-2021 Chrysler Pacifica plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Most incidents occurred at speeds greater than 25 MPH and resulted in a vehicle stall. The loss of motive power was often accompanied by a dashboard warning message indicating a charging fault. A review of vehicle data showed that the malfunction was correlated with an internal transmission fault. The ODI is opening an investigation to assess the scope, frequency, cause, and potential safety-related consequences of the alleged defect.

Crankshaft Or Camshaft Sensor Failures
2016 Dodge Journey, 2016 Jeep Compass, and 2016 Jeep Patriot

In December 2016, the NHTSA issued a recall (16V-907) that identified crankshaft or camshaft sensor failures on certain 2016 Dodge Journey, Jeep Compass, and Jeep Patriot vehicles. According to the recall report, the crankshaft or camshaft sensor may work intermittently, possibly causing the engine to stall while driving. Following this recall, the Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) has continued to receive consumer complaints from owners who say they are experiencing crankshaft or camshaft failures on similar vehicles not included in the recall. The NHTSA has opened a Recall Query (RQ) to further assess the scope, frequency, and safety consequences of the alleged defect.

Electronic Parking Brake (EPB) Inadvertently Activates While Driving
2014-2020 Jeep Cherokee

The Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) has received 80 complaints for 2014-2020 Jeep Cherokees alleging the Electronic Parking Brake (EPB) activated while the vehicle was in motion. Based on repair invoices, the problem is caused by water leaking into the vehicle and damaging the EPB module which inadvertently activates the vehicle to a stop. The ODI is aware of recall 15V-393 that addresses water ingress affecting the power lift-gate module on the same population of vehicles. The lift-gate module can potentially catch fire as a result of the water damage. Both the lift-gate and EPB modules are located in a similar area of the vehicle.

If your vehicle is experiencing repeated problems like the ones listed above, it could be a Lemon. Know your Lemon Law Rights. If you have any questions about your rights and the California Lemon Law, please call our office at 1-888-395-3666 and get some great Lemon Law advice!

Certain 2014-2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee and 2014-2019 Ram 1500 vehicles equipped with 3.0L diesel engines, could experience high-pressure fuel pump failure. If the pump fails while the vehicle is being operated, drivers will experience an unexpected loss of engine power and an increased chance of an accident.

In February 2022, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) Technical Safety and Regulatory Compliance (TSRC) organization started an investigation into Jeep Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 trucks, after receiving field reports that the fuel pump in some vehicles were prematurely failing. An investigation of the stall patterns and vehicle histories showed that the affected trucks were equipped with Bosch CP4.2 high-pressure fuel pumps (HPFP).

According to the defect report, a failure inside the fuel pump could introduce internal debris that could build up and cause fuel starvation. Fuel starvation may result in an unexpected loss of motive power, which could contribute to a vehicle to crash. The suspect period began on June 12, 2013, when 3.0L Diesel engines with suspect HPFPs were introduced into vehicle production, and ended on December 13, 2019, when 3.0L Diesel engines with suspect HPFPs were no longer used in vehicle production.

Warning signs that your vehicle may be experiencing this problem include:
Drivers may notice a Malfunction Indicator Lamp, a service Electronic Throttle Control indicator, a fuel leak at the HPFP, or excessive noise from the HPFP.

FCA US is aware of 215 customer assistance records, 1,061 warranty claims, and three field reports that could be related to this issue.

Owners receiving notices will be asked to return to their dealers to have the HPFP replaced. Dealers will also inspect the entire fuel system and replace components as necessary. FCA’s number for this recall is Z46 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-406.

During a configuration review at the supplier for an unrelated manufacturing issue, FCA US LLC Product Engineering became aware of an error with an airbag squib driver circuit that identified three internal faults not mapped to a diagnostic trouble code (DTC). An investigation was opened and it was discovered that some 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee, 2022 Jeep Wagoneer, and 2022 Jeep Grand Wagoneer vehicles may not set a DTC, and the airbag warning indicator may not illuminate.

The problem started in February 2021, when occupant restraint controllers (ORCs) with an incorrect software version were introduced into vehicle production, through to November 1, 2021, when the suspect ORCs were no longer used in vehicle production. Vehicle and supplier production records were used to determine the vehicles included in the recall population.

According to the defect report, “If specific ORC internal faults are active then a DTC will not be set and the airbag warning indicator may not illuminate. The internal faults will disable deployment of both the driver and passenger airbag squib 3 (related to airbag venting post-deployment) and knee airbags. The airbag warning indicator may not illuminate to notify the driver of possible compromised airbag system functionality. Reduced occupant protection in the event of a crash may result in an increased risk of injury to motor vehicle occupants.”

Owners receiving notices will be asked to return to their FCA dealers to have the occupant restraint controller reprogrammed with the correct software version that maps subject internal faults to a DTC. FCA US, LLC’s number for this recall is Y79 and the NHTSA campaign number is 21V-873.

If you purchased or leased a defective vehicle in California, it has turned out to be a lemon, and you need help to get rid of it, just fill out the above contact form or call us now at 1-888-395-3666 for a free case evaluation.

Our client purchased a new 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee.

The first visit for service was on January 8, 2018 because the regeneration light was turning on and off and they needed to replace the key battery.

The next visit was on February 5th as the vehicle was still regenerating and having fumes coming into the cabin. The vehicle had regenerated 4 times in less than 1000 miles.

On May 22nd the Exhaust regeneration message came on the dash.

The Jeep Grand Cherokee was back in the shop on June 5th because after performing an oil change the vehicle was being prompted to regenerate after 150 miles.

Our client was back at the authorized dealership on September 18th for service as the Check engine light was on.

November 3rd the check engine light was on again, the throttle light was on and the exhaust filter was 100% full.

The last visit was on November 27th and the check engine light was on again and the message, “The exhaust filter is nearly full” came on.

It was at this point that our client looked into the California Lemon Law and called our firm, The Law Office of Barry L. Edzant and spoke with the attorney. He requested that some documents be emailed over for his review. After discussing the potential Lemon Law case with the gentleman, he decided to sign a retainer agreement.

A demand letter was sent to FCA, USA to buy back the 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee under the California Lemon Law. FCA, USA decided to buy it back and reimbursed the client for their down payment, any payments made thus far, registration and pay off the balance of the loan minus a usage fee the manufacturer is entitled to under the Lemon Law. They also paid attorney fees.

Our client was very happy with the buyback. If you are having problems with your vehicle and think you may be driving a lemon, please contact our offices at 888-395-3666.

Our client purchased a 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee.

On September 28, 2018 he took his Jeep Grand Cherokee in for service because the A/C was not blowing cold air.

On March 19, 2019 he brought it back to the dealership because the A/C was not blowing cold air again.

On June 14th it was back at the dealership because there was a Freon or a chemical type smell upon turning the A/C on. The A/C was also making a loud hissing sound and would not get cooler as the day got hotter. Sometimes the A/C would not even turn on at all.

July 15th he brought it back to the dealership because the A/C would stop working after about an hour and there was still a hissing sound coming out of it.

It was at this point that he called our office for a free consultation with California Lemon Law Attorney, Barry L Edzant. After speaking with Mr. Edzant he sent in some paperwork to be reviewed. He signed on as a client and a demand letter was sent in to FCA, USA.

FCA, USA decided to buy back the vehicle under the California Lemon Law and reimbursed our client for his down payment, all payments made, his registration and paid off the vehicle minus a usage fee that manufacturer is entitled to under the law. They also paid the attorney fees. Our client was very happy with the result.

If you are having problem with your vehicle and have questions about your rights and the California Lemon Law, please call our office at 888-395-3666.

transmission hose leakIn March 2021, Chrysler / FCA USA Vehicle Safety and Regulatory Compliance (VSRC) organization received information about a potential trend in engine fires in certain Jeep Cherokee vehicles equipped with automatic transmissions.

The investigation found the problem to be that certain 2021 Jeep Cherokee SUVs were manufactured with transmission oil cooler (TOC) hoses with rubber that had been incorrectly cured. The suspect period began on January 19, 2021 and ended on March 8, 2021, when all suspect TOC hoses were removed from vehicle production.

According to the defect report filed with the NHTSA, incorrectly cured rubber could allow the hose to weaken and rupture. Transmission fluid leaking from the ruptured hose could contact an ignition source and lead to a vehicle fire. A vehicle fire increases the risk of injury to occupants, persons outside the vehicle and could result in property damage.

Owners receiving notices will be asked to return to their dealerships to have the TOC hoses inspected and replaced as necessary. Chrysler’s number for this recall is Y18 and the NHTSA campaign number is 21V-310.

Our client was very happy to buy her 2017 Jeep Patriot.

Her first visit to the authorized dealership was on July 31, 2017. She had multiple concerns that she shared with her service advisor. The tire light was on but all pressures were fine. The passenger front window would not go up with the driver side switch. There was also a problem in that the vehicle would only run for a few minutes when started with the remote.

The next visit was on November 10th because the check engine light was on.

Her last visit was December 6 and her Jeep Patriot was in the shop for 29 days as the check engine light was on again.

She contacted us in January and spoke with Barry L. Edzant, a California Lemon Law Attorney Specialist. He asked her to send our office some documents for him to review. After his review and consultation the client decided she wanted Barry to represent her.

A letter was submitted to FCA, USA demanding they buy back her vehicle under the California Lemon Law. FCA agreed to do so and reimbursed our client her down payment, all payments made, her registration, paid off the vehicle loan minus a mileage deduction the manufacturer is entitled to under the Lemon Law. They also paid the attorney fees. Needless to say our client was thrilled.

If you think your vehicle might be a lemon please give our office a cal and speak with Barry L. Edzant. The toll free phone number is 888-395-3666. Find out your rights under the California Lemon Law.

An illuminated airbag warning light in certain 2019 Jeep Cherokee or 2018 Volkswagen Atlas vehicles could mean an airbag crash sensor needs replacement.

ZF North America, the manufacturer of Remote Accelerometer Sensors (RAS) installed in these vehicles, are recalling certain RAS built from a specific production period. According to the defect report filed with the NHTSA, soldering connections inside the sensors may have been damaged due to exposure to higher than expected temperatures during manufacturing. As reported by FCA and VW, if present in a vehicle, an affected airbag crash sensor may not communicate correctly with the airbag control module. If this occurs, the airbag warning light will illuminate.

Warning: There is a risk of delayed airbag deployment during a frontal crash or a risk of a non-deployment in low speed collisions.

Those receiving notices will be asked to return to their dealers to have the air bag crash sensor replaced. Chrysler’s number for this recall is V63. Volkswagen’s number for this recall is 69AL. The NHTSA campaign number is 20E-052.