Mini CooperA manufacturing issue was identified in a small batch of 2021-2023 Mini Hardtop 2 Door Cooper SE vehicles. These electric cars were found to have a high voltage battery housing that did not meet the company’s assembly specifications. This discovery came to light after a concerning incident in the U.S. in October 2023, where one such vehicle experienced what is known as a thermal event—a significant overheating.

Following this incident, BMW initiated a thorough engineering analysis to pinpoint the cause. It was found that during certain production periods, there was a flaw in how the battery housing was sealed. Specifically, an inadequate amount of sealing compound was applied between the two halves of the battery module’s housing. This oversight made it possible for water to seep into the battery enclosure.

Water entering the high voltage battery compartment can trigger what is called an isolation fault. This type of fault compromises the battery’s integrity, leading to performance issues and safety concerns. Initially, such water ingress prompts the vehicle to display a warning message, alerting the driver of the fault and advising them to have the vehicle checked at a MINI service center.

Should the water exposure continue, the situation can escalate. The accumulation of moisture can cause multiple isolation faults, potentially causing the vehicle to stall. In more severe cases, particularly after long periods of inactivity, these faults could cause the battery to overheat significantly. Such overheating, while rare, could lead to a thermal event, even if the car is not in use.

To address this issue, BMW is recalling affected vehicles to inspect, and if necessary, repair the sealing of the battery housing. This includes a thorough leak test to ensure the integrity of the battery enclosure. Owners of the affected Mini Cooper SE models will be notified by mail with instructions to visit their dealer. Notification letters are scheduled to be sent out on June 21, 2024. The recall has been officially recorded under the NHTSA campaign number 24V-302.

Vehicle owners are encouraged to respond to the recall notice promptly to ensure their safety and the proper functioning of their vehicle.

Jaguar I-PaceIn a recent development, owners of 2019 Jaguar I-Pace vehicles are being urged to take immediate action due to a critical safety concern that could potentially lead to vehicle fires. The issue revolves around battery packs manufactured within a specific time frame, which have been identified as prone to technical faults, posing a significant risk of thermal overload.

The affected battery packs, produced between March 1, 2018, and May 31, 2018, have exhibited several technical deficiencies that increase the likelihood of short circuits within the battery cells. These short circuits generate excessive heat, particularly when the battery state of charge exceeds approximately 85%, ultimately triggering a thermal overload condition.

While some vehicles have undergone modifications through a previous safety recall (H441), mitigating the risk to some extent, Jaguar is ensuring the safety of all potentially affected vehicles and a new safety recall, identified as H484, has been initiated to address this critical issue.

The ramifications of a vehicle thermal overload event, such as fire or smoke, are severe and pose significant risks to occupants and bystanders alike. Occupant injury, damage to property, and even injury to persons outside the vehicle are potential outcomes of such incidents, underscoring the urgency of addressing this issue promptly and comprehensively.

In response to this safety concern, Jaguar has outlined interim measures for affected vehicle owners to mitigate the risk until a permanent solution is implemented. Owners are advised to park and charge their vehicles outdoors, away from structures, and to limit charging to a maximum of 75% state of charge. These precautions aim to minimize the risk of thermal overload incidents until the necessary repairs are completed.

Notification letters are scheduled to be dispatched to affected owners starting April 26, 2024. The recall process, identified by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) campaign number 24V-183, aims to rectify the underlying issue and ensure the safety and peace of mind of Jaguar I-Pace owners.

It’s imperative for owners of 2019 Jaguar I-Pace vehicles to heed this safety warning and comply with the manufacturer’s instructions promptly. Failure to address this issue in a timely manner could potentially lead to catastrophic consequences. Additionally, owners are encouraged to stay informed about further developments regarding the recall and to take appropriate action as advised by Jaguar and regulatory authorities.

NOTE: This recent safety recall, identified by NHTSA Recall Number 24V-183, is not the first instance where concerns regarding the same problem have been raised. Previous recalls, such as, NHTSA Recall Numbers 24V-085, 23V-709, and 23V-369, have also addressed issues related to thermal overload and potential fire hazards in Jaguar I-Pace vehicles. These recalls underscore the seriousness of the underlying technical issues and the manufacturer’s ongoing efforts to rectify them. Owners should be vigilant and proactive in responding to these recalls to ensure the safety and integrity of their vehicles.

The Volkswagen Group of America, operating under its Audi brand, has recently identified a critical issue in a range of its electric vehicle models. This issue revolves around the charging system, specifically the high-voltage battery modules, raising concerns about potential overheating and fire safety risks.

Affected Models

The problem affects several Audi models between 2019 and 2024, including the RS e-tron GT, e-tron GT, Q4 e-tron Sportback, Q4 e-tron, Audi A8, e-tron Quattro, e-tron Sportback Quattro, Q5, and A7.

Overheating High-Voltage Battery Modules

The central issue lies in the high-voltage battery modules, which are prone to overheating. This has been especially evident when charging with the industrial 220V/240V plug at a current of 40 amperes. Crucially, Investigations revealed that the charging equipment itself was not at fault. Instead, the issue often stemmed from household power outlets and wiring incapable of handling the required current, leading to overheating of the home infrastructure.

Initial Discovery and Response

The issue first came to light in April 2020, following a fire incident outside the U.S. Audi collaborated with their high-voltage battery supplier, LG Energy Solutions, to investigate. By mid-2023, a noticeable increase in thermal events led to a deeper examination. Despite a service campaign in April 2022 that included a software update for cell module balancing, issues persisted.

Recall and Remedial Actions

In response, Audi initiated a voluntary global safety recall, designated 93U9 by Audi and 23V-867 by the NHTSA. The recall includes installing onboard diagnostic software to monitor battery module performance and replacing affected modules as necessary. Interim notification letters are scheduled for February 2024, with a detailed follow-up expected in the third quarter of the same year.

Charging Cable Replacement

A significant aspect of the recall is the replacement of the power cable used for industrial sockets (220V/240V/NEMA 14-50). The existing cable (part number 7PP971678 ED) will be replaced with a new design (part number 7PP971678GA), featuring temperature sensors. These cables should be available in the second quarter of 2024.

Safety Concerns and User Guidance

Owners of affected models are advised to be cautious, especially when using industrial sockets for charging. The overheating issue can cause not only damage to the charging cable but also pose a risk to household electrical infrastructure. If the problem exists, users may notice the charging cable feeling hot to the touch after use.

This recall underscores the importance of matching electric vehicle charging systems with compatible household wiring. Audi’s proactive steps in addressing this issue highlight their commitment to customer safety and the integrity of their electric vehicle line. Owners of the affected models are encouraged to heed recall notices and ensure their home charging setups are compatible and safe.

The charging issue identified in Audi’s electric vehicles bears notable similarities to the Chevrolet Bolt recall (21V-650). In both cases, the central concern revolves around the battery systems and the associated risk of overheating, which could potentially lead to fire hazards. The Chevrolet Bolt recall, much like Audi’s, involved issues with high-voltage battery packs that were found to be prone to catching fire. Both recalls necessitated substantial corrective actions, including software updates, close monitoring of battery performance, and in some cases, the replacement of battery modules. Furthermore, these incidents highlight a broader challenge in the electric vehicle industry, emphasizing the need for more robust and safe battery technologies and charging infrastructures. Such parallels underline the growing pains of electric vehicle technology and the critical importance of ensuring safety as these vehicles become increasingly prevalent.

Honda has announced a safety recall for certain 2020-2022 CR-V Hybrid vehicles due to a critical issue concerning the 12-Volt battery cable. This recall comes after a detailed investigation into the safety of these vehicles, revealing a potential risk that could increase during specific types of crashes.

The identified problem lies in the routing of the 12-Volt battery cable, which is situated outside of the body frame and lacks a fuse on the power circuit. This design flaw could lead to the battery cable short-circuiting or overheating, particularly in the event of a crash impacting the left front fender area. Such a scenario raises significant concerns about the possibility of a fire and the risk of injury to the occupants.

Chronology of Events Leading to the Recall

  • May 17, 2021: The first known incident occurs, where a crash led to a short circuit in the battery cables located in the left front fender.
  • May 19, 2021: Honda receives a report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) about this incident.
  • May 28, 2021: Honda collaborates with the NHTSA to inspect the affected vehicle and analyze the issue.
  • August 18, 2021: After discussing the first incident with NHTSA, Honda initially concludes that there are no high-voltage related issues or similar complaints.
  • September 16, 2021: Honda conducts further tests to analyze the issue.
  • October 21, 2021: Honda’s evaluation suggests that the crash angle in the first incident was a rare occurrence.
  • June 13, 2022: Honda starts implementing a fuse in production models to address this potential issue.
  • August 18, 2022: A second incident under similar circumstances prompts another analysis by Honda.
  • August 29, 2023: Honda receives a warranty claim possibly related to the same issue.
  • October 30, 2023: Honda reassesses its stance on the rarity of such occurrences and the likelihood of future incidents.
  • December 6, 2023: Honda acknowledges a defect related to vehicle safety and decides to initiate a recall.

The Recall Process

Honda, adhering to its commitment to safety and customer satisfaction, has decided to recall the affected vehicles. Registered owners will be notified via mail to bring their vehicles to an authorized Honda dealer. Here, the battery cable will be replaced with an improved part that addresses the identified safety concern. Honda’s internal number for this recall is FGB, and the NHTSA campaign number is 23V-844.

Safety and Customer Support

From August 2019 through December 6, 2023, Honda has recorded two warranty claims related to this issue, with no reports of injuries or fatalities. This proactive recall demonstrates Honda’s dedication to the safety of its customers and its responsiveness to potential safety issues. Vehicle owners are encouraged to respond promptly to the recall notice to ensure their safety and the continued reliability of their vehicles.

Certain 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E cars might face a power problem due to an overheated high voltage battery contactor, potentially leading to an increased risk of accidents.

In June 2022, Ford’s Field Review Committee (FRC) gave the green light to a Field Service Action (FSA) named 22S41, specifically designed to tackle concerns regarding the overheating of the high voltage battery main contactor in select 2021-2022 Mustang Mach-E vehicles. To fix this issue, dealers updated the software for the Secondary On-Board Diagnostic Control Module (SOBDMC) and the Battery Energy Control Module (BECM). The enhanced SOBDMC software keeps an eye on the contactor’s temperature and smartly reduces the battery’s power output to prevent further damage. Meanwhile, the upgraded BECM software checks the contactor’s resistance to identify any damage, then it generates a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) and lowers the vehicle’s power to avoid more harm.

At the time of approving this FSA, Ford’s Critical Concern Review Group (CCRG) and Electrical Propulsion Engineering (EPE) teams found the software updates for BECM and SOBDMC to be a suitable way to minimize the safety risks linked to power loss. The software update, by monitoring contactor resistance, warns customers if the resistance exceeds a certain limit. Alongside the warning, the software reduces power to prevent further contactor damage and the associated power loss risk. Even with the reduced power, customers can safely accelerate to highway speeds. This approach was also reviewed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

In June 2022, Ford Motor Company decided to issue a safety recall (NHTSA Recall 22V-412) for 48,924 model year 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E vehicles produced between May 27, 2020, and May 24, 2022. This recall was prompted by concerns about high voltage battery contactors overheating, primarily due to direct current (DC) fast-charging and repeated full-throttle pedal events. This overheating could lead to arcing or deformation of the electrical contact surfaces. If this occurs, the contactor could either remain open or get welded shut. An overheated contactor that opens while driving may lead to an immediate loss of power without re-engagement.

Following consumer complaints, the Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) initiated a Recall Query (RQ) for 2021-2022 Ford Mach-E vehicles included in Recall 22V-412. These vehicles had previously received a remedy involving a Secondary On-Board Diagnostic Control Module (SOBDMC) software update to monitor contactor temperature and reduce battery power to protect the contactor, as well as a Battery Energy Control Module (BECM) software update to monitor contactor resistance and reduce vehicle power in case of an overheated contactor.

To address this issue, dealers will replace the high voltage battery junction box. This recall is identified by Ford as 23S56, and the corresponding NHTSA campaign number is 22V-687. Vehicles included in this recall that were previously repaired under recall 22V-412 will need to have the new remedy completed.

ford-mustang-mach-e

In the realm of electric vehicles (EVs), the 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E gained significant attention for its sleek design and promising performance. However, beneath its exterior allure, a complex challenge emerged that put the spotlight on battery-related issues. In June 2022, Ford Motor Company took steps to issue a safety recall (NHTSA Recall 22V-412) for a range of Mustang Mach-E vehicles, acknowledging battery problems that had the potential to impact both safety and performance.

2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E Battery Recall

The safety recall was prompted by concerns related to high voltage battery main contactors. These components, integral to the functioning of the vehicle’s battery system, were at risk of overheating. The primary culprits behind this issue were the effects of direct current (DC) fast-charging and frequent aggressive acceleration events, which placed excessive stress on these contactors. Overheating, led to arcing or deformation of the electrical contact surfaces. Perhaps the most alarming consequence was the potential for a contactor to remain open, resulting in a sudden loss of motive power during driving. This raised significant safety concerns due to the increased risk of accidents resulting from unexpected power loss.

The Office of Defects Investigation

The recall was further complicated by the involvement of the Office of Defects Investigation (ODI). Following the initial recall (22V-412) involving approximately 48,924 vehicles, the ODI received a series of consumer complaints. These complaints highlighted incidents of high voltage battery main contactor failures even after the prescribed remedy had been implemented. This indicated that the initial software updates, aimed at temperature monitoring and power reduction, might not have fully resolved the underlying issues. This discrepancy called into question the effectiveness of the initial recall and the adequacy of its remedy.

Ford’s Response

In response to the ongoing concerns, Ford issued a Technical Service Bulletin TSB 23-2020 which focused on replacing the High Voltage Battery Junction Box (HVBJB) in the affected vehicles. The HVBJB is a crucial component that facilitates the connection between various parts of the high voltage battery system. Consumers who had experienced a loss of motive power post the initial recall were directed towards this bulletin. The bulletin aimed to ensure that the remedy for the contactor failures was comprehensive and addressed any lingering issues.

Addressing The Problem

The complexity of addressing battery-related problems in the 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E underscored the challenges of integrating advanced EV technology into mainstream vehicles. The initial recall and its subsequent developments shed light on the interplay between software solutions and hardware replacements. While software updates were intended to mitigate the risks, the need for a hardware replacement (HVBJB) became evident as consumer complaints persisted.

Conclusion

The battery problems encountered by the 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E vehicles served as a valuable lesson for both automakers and consumers in the evolving world of electric vehicles. The recall (22V-412), the Office of Defects Investigation’s involvement, and Ford’s multi-faceted response emphasized the importance of thorough and quick problem-solving in this rapidly advancing domain. As the automotive industry continues to innovate, experiences like these pave the way for safer and more reliable electric vehicles in the future.

2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E Lemon Vehicle

If you find yourself grappling with persistent issues in your 2021-2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E vehicle, the California Lemon Law can offer you a potential lifeline. Designed to protect consumers from purchasing or leasing defective vehicles, this law provides a pathway to relief if your vehicle is deemed a “lemon.” If your Mustang Mach-E experiences substantial defects that impair its use, safety, or value, and these issues persist despite a reasonable number of repair attempts within the vehicle’s warranty period, you may be entitled to a replacement vehicle or a refund of the purchase price. The California Lemon Law serves as a crucial safeguard, empowering you to take decisive action to address your vehicle’s ongoing problems and helping you move forward with confidence.

Certain 2019-2024 Jaguar I-PACE SUV electric vehicles are facing a critical issue that could pose a potential threat of vehicle fires due to excessive heat buildup inside the high-voltage battery. The Jaguar Product Safety and Compliance Committee (PSCC) identified this problem in February 2022 through the Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) critical concerns reporting process. As a result, Jaguar initiated a thorough investigation into the matter.

To address the issue, Jaguar collected the batteries from the affected vehicles and conducted meticulous inspections at their testing facilities. Subsequently, the batteries were sent back to the supplier for further and more detailed analysis. In addition, Jaguar acquired Diagnostic Over The Air (DOTA) data for comprehensive examination and evaluation.

According to the defect report, specific 2019-2024 Jaguar I-PACE SUV electric vehicles have experienced instances of thermal overload, which can manifest as smoke or fire. The overheating primarily occurs beneath the vehicle, where the high-voltage traction battery is located. While investigations are still ongoing, Jaguar has proactively decided to install software that will effectively monitor the battery’s status.

Owners of the affected vehicles will receive notifications regarding the issue. They can visit a dealer or opt for an over-the-air (OTA) update to have the battery energy control module software updated. This updated software will continuously monitor the operational status of the battery pack assembly, identifying conditions that may lead to a thermal overload. In order to ensure safety, the software will provide enhanced driver warnings regarding the battery’s condition. When a risk is detected, the charging capacity of the High Voltage battery will be limited to 75%. A warning message will alert the driver, accompanied by instructions in the Owner Guide, which will direct them to take their vehicle to a Jaguar retailer for diagnosis and, if necessary, repair. The retailer will conduct a thorough inspection and, if required, replace the affected battery module or pack.

Jaguar has assigned the identification number H441 to this recall, while the NHTSA campaign number is 23V-369.

General Motors is still rolling out new batteries for the troubled Chevy Bolt electric vehicle, albeit very slowly. We are hearing from clients and potential clients that dealerships are putting them on “wait lists” for the new battery but are not hearing again from the dealership. The dealerships give the owner no times table for getting their new battery as well. Obviously, this is very frustrating for consumers who are tired of figuring out ways to safely charge their EV. To date, we have only heard of the new batteries actually being installed in the 2017 – 2019 year models, but not for any 2020-2021 models. The good news is that once the battery has been installed, consumers seem to be happy with the new battery giving them a longer range than the original. More importantly, we have not heard of any problems associated with the new battery. This is good news for consumers.


With that said, we are still accepting Chevy Bolt cases, regardless of whether the new battery has been installed, and we continue to achieve favorable settlements with General Motors. Many of our settlements are for cash, allowing the consumer to receive compensation while being allowed to keep the vehicle.

Please call us at 1-888-395-3666 for more details about this problem.

Chevrolet Bolt EV

Here is a summary of the defect.
General Motors recalled all of their Chevrolet Bolt EVs because there is a manufacturing defect affecting the battery cell. The problem is aggravated when the battery is charged to a full or nearly full state after it has been substantially depleted. The battery could overheat and catch fire, causing damage to the vehicle and structures around it. As a temporary solution, GM asked owners to reprogram their hybrid propulsion control module to limit a full charge.

The safety recall from the NHTSA states the following:
As an interim remedy, dealers will reprogram the hybrid propulsion control module to limit full charge to 90%. Until this interim is completed, customers should enable either “Hilltop Reserve” (for 2017-2018 model year vehicles) or “Target Charge Level” (for 2019 model year vehicles) using their vehicle’s infotainment center. These two features will limit the vehicle’s state of charge to 90% until the HPCM2 software re-calibration is applied. If customers are unable to successfully make these changes or do not feel comfortable making these changes, they will be advised to not park their car in their garage or carport until after they have visited their dealer.