Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. (VW) will be asking a small number of 2021 VW ID.4 electric crossover SUV owners, to return to their dealerships because of a problem affecting the solder connections inside the HV battery of their vehicles. This defect could result in a stall and may increase the risk of an accident. A fix for this problem is still under development by the manufacturer.

VW became aware of the defect in January 2021 when the first known field case occurred outside the U.S. VW quality and safety departments began to monitor the field reports for the nature and frequency of the non-starting condition and found reports of similar problems in other brand vehicles using the same or similar battery systems. During a multi-brand clearing committee meeting, impacted brands shared information on the potential stall while driving cases and decided to conduct a recall. Volkswagen will be conducting a recall on 351, 2021 VW ID.4 vehicles in the U.S. that contain the potentially affected parts.

According to the defect report, a manufacturing problem with the high voltage (HV) battery may have caused incorrect soldering on specific points of the flexible printed circuit assembly (FPCA). The amount of solder contact points of the FPCA is not sufficient and the thickness of the solder layer is out of tolerance parameters. The result is an unreliable connection inside the HV battery that could lead to a breakdown or stalling while driving. If this issue is present in the vehicle, the driver will be alerted by a high voltage system warning message in the instrument panel.

Owner notification letters about the defect are expected to be mailed by May 13, 2022. Volkswagen’s number for this recall is 9302 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-1562.

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Certain 2013-2014 model year Chevrolet Express and 2013-2014 model year GMC Savana HD vehicles equipped with 6.6L Duramax diesel engines (RPO LGH) could experience a malfunction indicator light (MIL) illumination because of a problem affecting the Exhaust Gas Re-circulation (EGR) cooler.

clogged EGR

EGR coolers can fail for a few different reasons. Coolant passageways become clogged and prevent exhaust gas from cooling, some EGR coolers may be susceptible to corrosion, and repeated cycling of extreme temperatures (thermal stress) can all cause your EGR to fail.

There are a few indications that your EGR is failing: the engine idles rough and stalls; there is an increase in fuel consumption and a decrease in performance; the engine management light is always on, and there is a smell of fuel in and around the vehicle.

General Motors is providing owners of certain 2013-2014 Chevrolet Express and 2013-2014 GMC Savana HD vehicles equipped with 6.6L Duramax diesel engines vehicles, with additional warranty protection. This special coverage covers the problem described above for a period of 10 years or 120,000 miles (193,000 km), whichever occurs first. The warranty covers the vehicles from the date the vehicle was originally placed in service, regardless of ownership.

** GM should notify customers if this special warranty coverage is on their vehicle.**

Repairs and adjustments qualifying under this special coverage must be performed by a General Motors dealer.

View the complete warranty document here: MC-10150564-9999.pdf

A small number of 2021-2022 Ford Escape and 2022 Lincoln Corsair hybrid power-train SUVs have been manufactured with a high voltage battery that could fail and result in a sudden loss of motor power. The problem was brought to Ford’s Critical Concern Review Group in October 2021 after an issue pertaining to an overheated high voltage battery bus bar was reported in Germany. Through a search of warranty reports, Ford identified an additional vehicle in Europe that reported a loss of function due to the overheated high voltage battery bus-bar.

During the manufacturing process, the high voltage bus-bar pad was not properly seated and could cause the pad to be mounted out of position prior to bus-bar welding. This condition could reduce the contact area between the cell terminal and the bus bar, giving it a high resistance. The high resistance could eventually result in an overheat situation.

According to the defect report, an overheated bus bar terminal may create a high resistance connection that could cause the battery pack high voltage bus voltage to fall below an operational level. If this happens, the hybrid power-train control module will sense the high voltage and detect a fault. A diagnostic trouble code will be sent and the vehicle will lose power. Drivers will also notice a “Stop Safely Now” warning message displayed on the instrument panel.

Ford’s team reviewed supplier process and production records to determine the population of affected parts. Affected vehicles are equipped with the 2.5L Hybrid power train and the suspect high voltage battery pack.

Dealers will replace the high voltage battery. Ford’s number for this recall is 21S48 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-149.

Do you think your Ford Escape or Lincoln Corsair could be a Lemon? Don’t live with a Lemon, especially if the problems you are having are safety-related. If you have any questions about your rights and the California Lemon Law, please call our office at 888-395-3666 for some great Lemon Law advice.

Certain 2016-2018 Ford and Lincoln, trucks and SUVs equipped with 3.5L Ecoboost engines could require more braking effort and distance to stop the vehicle. Ford will be asking owners to return to their dealerships for repairs.

In May 2016, Ford issued a recall (16V-345) for F-150s equipped with the 3.5L Ecoboost engines, because the brake master cylinder could leak and allow brake fluid from the front wheel circuit into the brake booster. After continued field data monitoring and discussions with NHTSA, Ford issued a second recall (20V-332), to extend the population for F-150s.

Ford continued to monitor field reports expanding the coverage into Ford Expedition and Lincoln Navigator vehicles built during the same period. These vehicles share a similar brake master cylinder design as the F-150 3.5L Ecoboost vehicles

Investigation into supplier records and discussion with the supplier identified additional steps taken by the supplier to further improve brake master cylinder seal installation from August 2016 to December 2016. These include an automated process to remove imperfect threads from the master cylinder outlet port, as well as actions to improve the installation of the rearmost cup seal in the master cylinder. Master cylinders with these improvements were incorporated into vehicle production by January 31, 2017.

In March 2022, Ford’s Field Review Committee reviewed the concern and approved a safety
recall action. Ford is aware of 4 low-speed/low-impact accident allegations with no injuries.

Vehicles manufactured with these defective fuel injectors include:
2016-2017 Ford Expedition
2016-2018 Ford F-150
2016-2017 Lincoln Navigator

Dealers will correct the problem by replacing the brake master cylinder. If the master cylinder is leaking, the brake booster will also be replaced. This recall is an expansion of NHTSA recall number 20V-332. Ford’s number for this recall is 22S11 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-150.

General Motors (GM) will be providing owners of certain 2016-2017 Chevrolet, Cadillac and GMC trucks additional warranty coverage because of a problem that could affect the fuel injectors in their engines. The trucks receiving additional warranty are equipped with 5.3L or 6.2L engines.

Vehicles manufactured with these defective fuel injectors include:
2016-2017 Cadillac Escalade
2016-2017 Cadillac Escalade ESV
2016-2017 Chevrolet Silverado
2016-2017 Chevrolet Suburban
2016-2017 Chevrolet Tahoe
2016-2017 GMC Sierra
2016-2017 GMC Yukon
2016-2017 GMC Yukon XL

** GM will notify customers if this special warranty coverage is on their vehicle.**

The special coverage will extend the warranty of the above vehicles, for a period of 10 years or 150,000 miles (240,000km), whichever occurs first, from the date the vehicle was originally purchased, regardless of ownership. This special coverage only applies to vehicles in these states: California, Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

According to documents released by GM, “Under certain circumstances, one or more of the vehicle’s fuel injectors may deliver an improper amount of fuel to the engine. If this happens, the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (the Check Engine Light) will illuminate to warn the driver there is a problem. The engine will begin to run rough and will eventually stall. Diagnostic trouble codes, including P0300-P0308 or DTC P050D, will be set.

Other symptoms of a bad or dirty fuel injector include: The vehicle is hard to start and idles rough; Poor performance and increased fuel consumption; and an engine knock or detonation that could lead to complete engine failure.

 Automotive Defect Investigation

The NHTSA Office of Defects Investigation (NHTSA) has opened two separate investigations related to unexpected breaking in certain Honda and Tesla vehicles. These vehicles are equipped with collision mitigation braking systems (CMBS) or advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), which visually and audibly alert the drivers of a potential collision. Under certain circumstances, the system will automatically apply the brakes to help reduce the force of an unavoidable collision.

The problem of unexpected braking has been called “Phantom Braking”. Phantom braking is when a vehicle’s brakes activate unexpectedly even when traffic is flowing normally or there is no obstacle to avoid.

Inadvertent Automatic Emergency Braking
2017-2019 Honda CR-V and 2018-2019 Honda Accord
NHTSA Investigation Number: PE22003

The NHTSA has received a total of 278 complaints and several Early Warning Reports alleging unexpected activation of the collision mitigation braking system (CMBS) in some 2017-2019 Honda CR-V and 2018-2019 Honda Accord vehicles. Driver complaints include high-speed braking incidents occurring with nothing obstructing the vehicle’s path of travel. Of the 278 complaints, 6 allege a collision with minor injuries.

Inadvertent or unexpected braking activation while driving can cause unexpected speed reductions that can lead to increased vulnerability to rear-end impact collisions. The complaints allege that the inadvertent braking events occur without warning and randomly.

Unexpected Brake Activation
2021-2022 Tesla Model 3 and 2021-2022 Tesla Model Y
NHTSA Investigation Number: PE22002

The NHTSA has also received 354 complaints alleging unexpected brake activation in 2021-2022 Tesla Model 3 and 2021-2022 Tesla Model Y vehicles.

Driver reports have been characterized as “phantom braking”. Tesla describes the subject vehicles as equipped with a suite of advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) features referred to as Autopilot which Tesla states will allow the vehicle to brake and steer automatically within its lanes.

The complaints allege that while utilizing the ADAS features including adaptive cruise control, the vehicle unexpectedly applies its brakes while driving at highway speeds. Complainants report that the rapid deceleration can occur without warning, at random, and often repeated in a single drive cycle.

These investigations are a Preliminary Evaluation (PE) to determine the scope and severity of the potential problem and to fully assess the potential of these safety-related issues. If a defect is found, the NHTSA will issue a recall.

A small number of 2021-2022 Chevrolet Corvette owners will be contacted by the manufacturer regarding a problem affecting the rear half shaft assemblies in their vehicles. According to the defect report, Some Corvettes may have a rear half-shaft assembly that is missing one or more ball bearings. If any ball bearings are missing, the half-shaft will eventually fail, resulting in a loss of propulsion.

In September 2021, a General Motors (GM) engineer carried out a warranty inspection of a rear half shaft recovered from a 2021 Chevrolet Corvette. The half shaft fractured and caused the vehicle to lose propulsion. Upon further inspection, it was found that the half shaft was missing two of six ball bearings. Follow-up, discussions with the supplier identified a potential failure in the inspection process that led to the miss-build. In October, the GM engineer submitted a report to GM’s Speak Up For Safety (SUFS) program and the supplier identified 19 vehicle identification numbers (VINs) containing half-shafts that may have been improperly inspected.

GM is not aware of any injuries or crashes related to this condition. In February, GM’s Safety and Field Action Decision Authority decided to conduct a safety recall for any 2021-2022 Chevrolet Corvette that may have received suspect rear half shaft assemblies.

Those receiving notices will be asked to return to their GM dealers to have the left and/or right rear half-shaft assemblies inspected and replaced as necessary. Owner notification letters are expected to be mailed in April. GM’s number for this recall is N212351320 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-091.

Do you think your Chevy Corvette could be a Lemon? Don’t live with a Lemon, especially if the problems you are having are safety-related. If you have any questions about your rights and the California Lemon Law, please call our office at 888-395-3666 for some great Lemon Law advice.

In December 2020, Toyota began an investigation into certain 2021 Toyota C-HR crossover SUVs after receiving field reports from the Japanese market alleging that when using the Traffic Movement Notification feature (a Japanese market feature not available in the U.S.), the vehicle radar sensor did not detect a vehicle driving in front of it. An inoperative radar sensor also meant that other features, such as Pre-Collision System (PCS), Dynamic Radar Cruise Control (DRCC), and Lane Tracing Assist (LTA) could be affected. In these cases, dealer technicians observed that the beam axis for the radar sensor was out of specification and adjusted it during the inspection. After completing the adjustment and initializing the radar sensor, the vehicles were able to detect the preceding vehicle.

According to the defect report, certain 2021 Toyota C-HR vehicles are equipped with a millimeter-wave sensor (radar sensor) and a camera to detect objects in front of it. These sensors also support certain driver assistance features, including the Pre-Collision System (PCS).

Under certain circumstances, the initialization of the radar sensor may not have been completed correctly, resulting in the PCS not being able to detect an object in front of it. As a result, the vehicle will not provide warnings or braking assist, and would not display a message or indicator to the driver that PCS is not functional. An inoperative PCS, without a PCS malfunction indicator to the driver, may increase the risk of a crash in certain driving situations.

As of January 2022, Toyota has not received any U.S. field reports or warranty claims related to this condition. Based on their investigation results, however, Toyota decided to conduct a voluntary safety recall campaign. Owners of the subject vehicles will be asked to take their vehicles to their Toyota dealer to have the radar sensor inspected and properly initialize if necessary. Toyota’s number for this recall is 22TA02 and the NHTSA campaign number is 22V-107.